Is Egypt Blocking The Discovery Of Nefertiti’s Tomb?

 

statue of Nefertiti

A well known Egyptologist named Nicholas Reeves may have found Nefertiti’s resting place in two hidden chambers in King Tut’s tomb.  His preliminary radar scans of the monument have found “two open spaces, with signs of metal and organic matter” behind the tombs western and northern walls.

His theory is that undiscovered chambers lie behind the tomb and likely contain the tomb of Queen Nefertiti, one of  Egypt’s most famous figures. The theory has prompted new exploration and it has been extensively scanned by radar.

When he presented his theory at the the Egyptian conference May 8-9, 2016 he was met with disdain and denial.

“In all my career… I have never come across any discoveries in Egypt due to radar scans.” Zahi Hawass said.  He further suggested the team should go take their radar somewhere else, and practice on other monuments known to have hidden chambers.

But what Hawass said isn’t accurate.  In 2000 Reeves’ team found an undisturbed funerary chamber (KV63) using ground-penetrating radar in the Valley of the Kings.

GPR study valley of kings

Tomb found in GPR study in 2000.

The Antiquities Minister Khaled el-Anani, said he would continue to allow scans of the tomb but that they wouldn’t be allowed to do any physical exploration until he was “100 percent sure there is a cavity behind the wall.”

reevesThe thing is that Nicholas Reeves isn’t just some archaeologist off the street. He is the Director of the Amarna Royal Tombs Project and the Senior Egyptologist with the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition.  He graduated with honors and received his PhD 31 years ago for his thesis on tomb robbery and mummy caching.  He has previously been the Curator of the Department of Egyptian Antiquities at The British Museum.

In other words – Reeves is highly qualified and yet the Egyptian Antiquities department is blocking him.

Why?nefertiti 2

Could it be because Egypt doesn’t want anyone to know what is behind that wall?  Nefertiti and her entire family are known for their elongated skulls.

A new discovery, one so public, would be impossible to cover up.  DNA evidence taken from a mummy carries a lot of weight.  Many have theorized that both Tutankhamun parents, Akhenaten and Nefertiti, are ancient aliens, or a lost human species.

akhenaten-nefertiti-daughters-rays-of-the-aten

Akhenaten and Nefertiti shown with daughters. All have elongated skulls.

Nefertiti ruled alongside her husband during the 18th dynasty. Following Akhenaten’s death around 1336 BC Nefertiti ruled independently for 14 years.  She was known to be a shrewd military commander as well as a beautiful, graceful woman.  She became Tutankhamen’s guardian and gained further power by marrying him to one of her daughters.

Mystery and intrigue surround her disappearance, because the queen simply vanished from the world scene after the 14th year.  While her tomb has never been found she is said to have been buried with military weapons of gold that lay beside her mirror, fan, and jewels.

In closing Nicholas Reeves said “I was looking for the evidence that would tell me that my initial reading was wrong, but I didn’t find any evidence to suggest that. I just found more and more indicators that there is something extra going on in Tutankhamun’s tomb.”

We can only hope that enough pressure is put on Egypt to allow him to find out.

Written by: Camara Cassin

References:

Fox News: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2016/05/09/archaeologists-clash-in-egypt-over-king-tut-tomb-theory.html

Nicholas Reeves: http://www.nicholasreeves.com/

Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nefertiti

 

 

What lies beneath?

A tantalising clue to the location of a long-sought pharaonic tomb

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NOTHING has inspired generations of archaeologists like the discovery in 1922 of the treasure-packed tomb of Tutankhamun. What if another untouched Egyptian trove lies buried, not in a distant patch of desert, nor even nearby amid the overlapping tomb-shafts of Luxor’s Valley of the Kings, but instead just a millimetre’s distance from plain view?

This is the dramatic hypothesis of a just-published paper by Nicholas Reeves, a British Egyptologist who co-discovered an undisturbed Egyptian tomb in 2000, and who is at the University of Arizona. His key evidence is disarmingly simple, and in fact free to see on the internet in the form of photographs published by Factum Arte, a Madrid- and Bologna-based specialist in art replication that recently created a spectacular, life-sized facsimile of Tutankhamun’s tomb, intended for tourists to visit without endangering the original.

What Mr Reeves found in these ultra-high-resolution images, which reveal the texture of walls beneath layers of paint in the original tomb, was a number of fissures and cracks that suggest the presence of two passages that were blocked and plastered to conceal their existence. (See image, with proposed new areas in yellow.) One of these would probably lead to a storeroom; its position and small size mirror that of an already-uncovered storeroom inside the multi-chambered tomb. The other, bigger possible doorway in the north wall of Tutankhamun’s burial chamber suggests something much more exciting.

There are several oddities about Tutankhamun’s tomb. It is small compared with others in the valley. The objects found in it, while magnificent, seemed hurriedly placed and were found to be largely second-hand; even the boy-king’s famous gilded funerary mask sports the strangely unmanly feature of pierced ears. The tomb’s main axis is angled to the right of the entrance shaft, an arrangement typical of Egyptian queens rather than kings.

Noting that the bigger of the two doorways he may have located aligns perfectly with both sides of the tomb’s entrance chamber, Mr Reeves thinks it could conceal a corridor continuing along the same axis, in the scale and shape of other nearby royal tombs. All this, as well as evidence that the tomb’s decoration and construction were executed at different stages, leads him to conclude that this corridor would lead to the burial chamber of a queen, or perhaps several princesses.

Among the tombs and royal mummies that archaeologists have identified from Tutankhamun’s dynasty, Ancient Egypt’s 18th, there remains one gaping absence. Nefertiti, the wife of Tutankhamun’s father Akhenaten, was not only a famed beauty, as the world knows from her famous bust in Berlin. Her titles indicate that she served as co-regent and possibly also as a pharaoh in her own right after Akhenaten’s death, meaning Nefertiti’s tomb and its contents would be every bit as magnificent as her stepson’s. Indeed, if Mr Reeves is right, what Tutankhamun got was her leftovers; even his face mask might originally have been intended for the queen.

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