BBC News: Breakthrough in world’s oldest undeciphered writing

by Amish Shah




BBC News: Breakthrough in world’s oldest undeciphered writing

This from an article written by the BBC on 25 October 2012. Let’s revisit this…

The world’s oldest undeciphered writing system, which has so far defied attempts to uncover its 5,000-year-old secrets, could be about to be decoded by Oxford University academics.

 

Experts working on proto-Elamite hope they are on the point of ‘a breakthrough.

This international research project is already casting light on a lost bronze age middle eastern society where enslaved workers lived on rations close to the starvation level.

“I think we are finally on the point of making a breakthrough,” says Jacob Dahl, fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford and director of the Ancient World Research Cluster.

Dr Dahl’s secret weapon is being able to see this writing more clearly than ever before.

In a room high up in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, above the Egyptian mummies and fragments of early civilisations, a big black dome is clicking away and flashing out light.

This device, part sci-fi, part-DIY, is providing the most detailed and high quality images ever taken of these elusive symbols cut into clay tablets. This is Indiana Jones with software.

This way of capturing images, developed by academics in Oxford and Southampton, is being used to help decode a writing system called proto-Elamite, used between around 3200BC and 2900BC in a region now in the south west of modern Iran.

And the Oxford team think that they could be on the brink of understanding this last great remaining cache of undeciphered texts from the ancient world.

Tablet computer

Dr Dahl, from the Oriental Studies Faculty, shipped his image-making device on the Eurostar to the Louvre Museum in Paris, which holds the most important collection of this writing. 

Jacob Dahl wants the public and other academics to help with an online decipherment of the texts

The clay tablets were put inside this machine, the Reflectance Transformation Imaging System, which uses a combination of 76 separate photographic lights and computer processing to capture every groove and notch on the surface of the clay tablets.

It allows a virtual image to be turned around, as though being held up to the light at every possible angle.

These images will be publicly available online, with the aim of using a kind of academic crowdsourcing.

He says it’s misleading to think that codebreaking is about some lonely genius suddenly understanding the meaning of a word. What works more often is patient teamwork and the sharing of theories. Putting the images online should accelerate this process.

Making it even harder to decode is the fact that it’s unlike any other ancient writing style. There are no bi-lingual texts and few helpful overlaps to provide a key to these otherwise arbitrary looking dashes and circles and symbols.

This is a writing system – and not a spoken language – so there’s no way of knowing how words sounded, which might have provided some phonetic clues.

Dr Dahl says that one of the really important historical significances of this proto-Elamite writing is that it was the first ever recorded case of one society adopting writing from another neighbouring group.

But infuriatingly for the codebreakers, when these proto-Elamites borrowed the concept of writing from the Mesopotamians, they made up an entirely different set of symbols.

Why they should make the intellectual leap to embrace writing and then at the same time re-invent it in a different local form remains a puzzle.

But it provides a fascinating snapshot of how ideas can both spread and change.

In terms of written history, this is the very remote past. But there is also something very direct and almost intimate about it too.

You can see fingernail marks in the clay. These neat little symbols and drawings are clearly the work of an intelligent mind.

 A set of 76 lights are used in the capturing of images of surface marks in the ancient tablets

 

Dr Dahl remains passionate about what this work says about such societies, digging into the deepest roots of civilisation. This is about where so much begins. For instance, proto-Elamite was the first writing ever to use syllables.

If Macbeth talked about the “last syllable of recorded time”, the proto-Elamites were there for the first.

And with sufficient support, Dr Dahl says that within two years this last great lost writing could be fully understood. 

Read Full Article Here





Amish Shah
Amish Shah

Author



Also in News

The Stellar Black Holes: Are They the Fountain of Life and Creation?
The Stellar Black Holes: Are They the Fountain of Life and Creation?

by Ane Krstevska

This could provide evidence for Haramein’s unified field theory, helping people understand more about the way that systems work.

View full article →

Are the Minerals Found on the Moon an Alien Material?
Are the Minerals Found on the Moon an Alien Material?

by Ane Krstevska

Years ago, there were some unusual foreign minerals which were discovered in those craters of the Moon, which may be alien. This claim was made in a paper which was published years ago, saying that the rare minerals are probably not indigenous to the Moon as it was previously believed.

View full article →

Scientists Discover Two Giant Structures Deep Below the Earth’s Surface
Scientists Discover Two Giant Structures Deep Below the Earth’s Surface

by Ane Krstevska

Scientists ponder on the meaning of these mysteries. Where did they come from? What are they made of?

View full article →

Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out